ABOUT HOSTS

Joe Anderson
ABOUT Joseph

As President of Pure Financial Advisors, Joe Anderson has led the company to achieve over $2 billion in assets under management and has grown their client base to over 2,160 in just ten years of the firm opening. When Joe began working with Pure Financial in 2008, they had almost no clients, negative revenue and no [...]

Alan Clopine
ABOUT Alan

Alan Clopine is the CEO & CFO of Pure Financial Advisors. He currently leads Pure Financial Advisors along with Michael Fenison and Joe Anderson. Alan joined the firm about one year after it was established. At that time the company had less than 100 clients and approximately $50 million of assets under management. As of [...]

Published On
October 8, 2016

Your 401(k) plan options probably include at least one target-date fund. Hosts discuss this one-step strategy for investing for retirement, then finish the hour answering listeners’ investing questions.

2:47 “Unfortunately, a lot of you are not using these target-date funds correctly…first of all, a target-date fund has its own allocation.”

7:53 “There are two expenses in any investment: expense ratios and then the other cost is risk.”

11:32 “Should I withhold my taxes when purchasing a home?”

17:06 “Will I be taxed if I don’t touch the funds in a transferred IRA?”

19:21 “We now have a monthly standing lunch n’ learn; it’s called Road to Retirement…it’s an introduction to financial planning and the key areas you should look at. We’ll go into some specific strategies when it comes to taxes, Social Security, investments.”

22:02 “What are the pros and cons of investing before/after tax dollars into a 401(k)?”

26:34 “If we were disciplined enough to save those tax savings and invest it, we’d probably come out ahead…but most of us don’t do that and we just spend whatever we have.”

28:59 “What should I do with my portion of my ex-husband’s IRA?”

32:47 “I am 51 years old and finally in a job which offers a 401(k) option…should I invest in my 401(k) or pay off my debt?”

35:58 “Even if I don’t have an [employer] match, I still want to save for retirement and I don’t want to ignore it. The longer you give that money to compound, the more you’re going to have. So the sooner you start saving, the better.”